Antiracism

What is Antiracism?

What is ‘antiracism’?

The following two talks provide excellent frameworks for clarifying just why whiteness and belonging to a western culture makes thinking about White supremacy, let alone talking about it just so difficult, it slips out of focus as we try to grapple with it. Its elusive quality means we need to express and externalise it and yet our fear of being wrong and bad holds us back. The sense of shame overwhelms and flooded with hopelessness we don’t take the actions needed for us to be leaders in our families and workplaces on the issue of race and standing with Black, Indigenous and People of Colour (BIPOC).  We want to be allies but our fragility can make us dangerous to BIPOC and so we become part of the problem and another burden.  It is important that white people have a space to do their own work rather than rely on BIPOC to explain it to us. 

Antiracism as human development

I enjoy Resmaa Menakem’s talk “Notice the rage; Notice the silence” which among many things sees White people being able to have these conversations as vital for their own personal development and how to do that we need to move into and through the discomfort. My work with Focusing and Brainspotting enables people to stay grounded and regulated as they touch into the painful areas of shame. This discomfort is already in our systems and we put energy into ignoring it and keeping it out of sight, as we acknowledge it we become more grounded and able to step up and do the healing work our hearts long for.

Being good/bad and being ‘nice’

Robin DiAngelo explains what racism is beyond good/bad thinking so we can actually take action as good allies and leaders in our lives.